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2018 BCBEC Conference & AGM Speakers

October 26 @ 7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday, October 26th, 2018
JW Marriott Parq
39 Smithe Street
Vancouver, BC
7:00 am – 5:00 pm

(Updated September 27, 2018 8:50am)

Conference Program:

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Speakers’ Bios and Detailed Conference Presentation Summaries:



Tim Ryce
City of North Vancouver

Tim Ryce is a Professional Engineer and Deputy Chief Building Official for the City of North Vancouver. He developed the City of Vancouver’s first Green Homes Program in 2008, instituting North America’s first mandatory building energy efficiency rating requirements, and is a past member of the national Standing Committee on Energy Efficiency in Buildings for the Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes. Tim was also a member of the Part 3 and Part 9 technical working groups for the BC Energy Step Code.

Presentation: Step Code Implementation Issues

BC Step code implementation issues and examples Step code implementation is a local option at this time but it points to the direction of the code in the future. Elements of the step code apply to both Part 9 and Part construction. The approach to low rise, single family dwellings in Part 9 has been introduced to home builders and designers. The code also applies to larger Part 9 multi-family dwellings, as well as Part 3 construction.

This panel session will review how two local municipalities are approaching the higher standards of construction laid out in the Step code, some of the issues that have come up, and reaction from the design/development community.

 


Norm Connolly
City of New Westminster

Norm Connolly, MCIP RPP is an urban planning professional and Community Energy Manager with the City of New Westminster. In this role, he provides leadership on the City’s Community Energy & Emissions Plan with regard to renewable energy systems, as well as spearheading the development of community-wide energy efficiency and GHG emission reduction programs, policies and performance standards for new and existing buildings through the City’s Energy Save New West initiative. He plays a key role on a staff team that is facilitating local adoption of the BC Energy Step Code into land use policy, with current efforts focused on supportive compliance verification tools and engaging the design and development community.

Norm has a Masters of Environmental Design in Planning from the University of Calgary, and a post-baccalaureate in Community Economic Development from Simon Fraser University.

Presentation: Step Code Implementation Issues

BC Step code implementation issues and examples Step code implementation is a local option at this time but it points to the direction of the code in the future. Elements of the step code apply to both Part 9 and Part construction. The approach to low rise, single family dwellings in Part 9 has been introduced to home builders and designers. The code also applies to larger Part 9 multi-family dwellings, as well as Part 3 construction.

This panel session will review how two local municipalities are approaching the higher standards of construction laid out in the Step code, some of the issues that have come up, and reaction from the design/development community.

 


Curtis Hepting
EnerSys Analytics Inc.

Curt Hepting, P.Eng., has experience providing engineering direction and support on a variety of projects involving building science. Projects include energy analyses and simulations, spreadsheet and database applications development, load research and codes evaluation, and the development of custom computer software tools. Mr. Hepting has a Bachelor of Science degree in Architectural Engineering from the University of Colorado where he specialized in Building Energy Efficiency. He has written dozens of professional reports and manuals for clients and has authored several professional papers on the topic of building energy analysis and methods. Mr. Hepting is a registered professional engineer in British Columbia and in the State of Colorado and is a LEED Accredited Professional. He was an author of the Joint professional Practice Guidelines – Whole Building Energy Modelling Services.

Presentation: Professional Practice Guidelines for Whole Building Energy Modelling Services

The Joint Architectural Institute of BC and Engineers and Geoscientists BC Professional Practice Guidelines – Whole Building Energy Modelling Services have been released by the two associations on 15th August 2018.

The purpose of these guidelines is to standardize professional practice when architects and engineers are working on projects that utilize whole Building Energy Modelling. The Guidelines apply to architects and engineers who are providing, procuring, contributing to, and/or coordinat¬ing Building Energy Modelling services on new and existing buildings of all types and sizes, regardless of the requirements for professional design and review within building codes. The presentation will provide an overview of these practice guidelines including scope and applicability of these guidelines, qualification requirements for energy modellers and professionals taking responsibility for energy modelling work, professional practice considerations, roles and responsibilities of various design team members in relation to the energy modelling work, and quality management in professional practice. Finally, relevance of these guidelines in various applications of modelling such as optimization and forecasting, code compliance (including BC Energy Step Code), existing buildings facilities management and meeting incentives or rating systems will be discussed.

 


Harshan Radhakrishan
Engineers and Geoscientists BC

In his role as a Practice Advisor at Engineers and Geoscientists BC, Harshan Radhakrishnan, P.Eng., supports government relations programs as they relate to areas of climate action, adaptation, management of potable water, sustainability, and energy efficiency. This includes providing professional practice and ethics guidance to the Association, the public and members/licensees on matters related to the professional and ethical practice of engineering and geoscience in BC and through Engineers Canada, nationally. Mr. Radhakrishnan also provides staff support to EGBC’s climate change advisory group, sustainability committee, and other designated committees, including the BC Energy Step Code Council and has project managed the development of Joint professional Practice Guidelines – Whole Building Energy Modelling Services.

Presentation: Professional Practice Guidelines for Whole Building Energy Modelling Services

The Joint Architectural Institute of BC and Engineers and Geoscientists BC Professional Practice Guidelines – Whole Building Energy Modelling Services have been released by the two associations on 15th August 2018.

The purpose of these guidelines is to standardize professional practice when architects and engineers are working on projects that utilize whole Building Energy Modelling. The Guidelines apply to architects and engineers who are providing, procuring, contributing to, and/or coordinat¬ing Building Energy Modelling services on new and existing buildings of all types and sizes, regardless of the requirements for professional design and review within building codes. The presentation will provide an overview of these practice guidelines including scope and applicability of these guidelines, qualification requirements for energy modellers and professionals taking responsibility for energy modelling work, professional practice considerations, roles and responsibilities of various design team members in relation to the energy modelling work, and quality management in professional practice. Finally, relevance of these guidelines in various applications of modelling such as optimization and forecasting, code compliance (including BC Energy Step Code), existing buildings facilities management and meeting incentives or rating systems will be discussed.

 


Lorne Ricketts
RDH Building Science Inc.

Lorne Ricketts, MASc, P.Eng. is an Associate and Building Science Specialist with RDH Building Science Inc. where he specializes in new construction, investigation, and research work. Lorne’s research work has included focus on airflow in buildings, and he led the development of the Illustrated Guide to Achieving Airtight Buildings published by BC Housing.

Presentation: Adventures in Large Building Airtightness Testing: Lessons Learned from 7 years of Testing in Seattle

Whole-building air leakage testing has been mandatory in all new buildings in Washington State since 2011. During this time dozens of high-rise buildings have been constructed and tested in the Seattle Area. While it is theoretically possible to test a building of any size, taller buildings present a number of unique challenges that must be overcome. The effects of bad weather are far more pronounced in taller buildings, and the schedule-driven world of new construction cannot afford to wait for a good weather window to perform an air leakage test. Stack effect and wind are the two primary factors that inhibit collection of valid test data, and most testing standards offer relatively poor guidance about the acceptable conditions for testing.

Several case studies will be presented and discussed, including multiple guarded tests on a 41-story multifamily tower. Guarded testing of representative sample areas of a building can relieve much of the uncertainty regarding weather conditions; however, it presents a new set of coordination challenges with the construction team as these tests typically occur during construction. Given that most high-rise buildings are relatively uniform for the majority of floors, testing portions of a building can be considered a viable alternative to whole-building testing in many cases.

 


Patrick Roppel
Morrison Hershfield

Patrick Roppel, M.A.Sc., P.Eng. – Principal, Building Performance Analysis Department Manager
Patrick has over 15 years of consulting experience related to building science and building envelope energy efficiency with a focus on providing tools and guidance to industry to help practitioners make design decisions related to constructability, thermal, structural, energy, and hygrothermal performance. Patrick has led several successful landmark projects related to providing timely industry guidance, such as ASHRAE RP-1365 Thermal Performance of Building Envelope Details for Mid- and High-Rise Buildings, Building Envelope Thermal Bridging (BETB) Guide, the Attic Ventilation and Moisture Research Study, and Guide to Low Thermal Energy Demand for Large Buildings (Low TEDI Guide).

Presentation: TEDI Guidelines

This presentation provides an overview of the Guide to Low Thermal Energy Demand for Large Buildings aka the Low TEDI Guide. We will go over a chapter-by-chapter summary to get you familiar with this resource. The Low TEDI Guide aims to broaden the understanding of how high-rise residential buildings can meet stricter levels of performance, such as Passive House, BC Energy Step Code, City of Vancouver Zero Emission Building Plan and City of Toronto Zero Emissions Building Framework.

The focus is on current Canadian code requirements, construction practices and tested systems for high-rise residential buildings. Nevertheless, the concepts apply broadly and offer a starting point for the integrated design of Low TEDI buildings.

You can download the Guide to Low Thermal Energy Demand for Large Buildings at BC Housing’s website using the following link: Guide to Low Thermal Energy Demand for Large Buildings or Low TEDI GUIDE

For a general overview of what the Low TEDI Guide provides, follow the link below: Morrison Hershfield Blog – Low TEDI Guide

 


Andrew Pape-Salmon
Building and Safety Standards Branch,
Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing

Andrew Pape-Salmon, P.Eng., MRM, FCAE, FCSSE is the Executive Director of the Building and Safety Standards Branch with the BC Government.
The Branch is responsible for:

  • The Building Act and building regulations such as the BC Building, Plumbing and Fire Codes, including the Energy Step Code which provides a technical roadmap to net-zero energy construction.
  • Homeowner Protection Act.
  • Safety Standards Act.

Andrew has led the project to develop PNWER’s Roadmap to Resilient, Ultra-Low Energy Buildings in the Pacific Northwest, both in his current government position, and also in his previous consulting engineer position with RDH Building Science. He and his colleagues presented policy best practices in 2013, a brainstorm on priorities in 2014, case studies in 2015 and 2016 and an estimate of PNWER-wide benefits in 2017.

Andrew is a Professional Engineer with a Master’s Degree in Resource and Environmental Management, specializing in energy and resource economics and policy. In March 2018, Andrew attended the 100 Resilient Cities Network Exchange on Seismic Resilience in Mexico City.

Presentation: Building Envelope First with the BC Energy Step Code

Andrew will provide a technical overview of the Energy Step Code and an update on local government adoption across BC. He will provide insights on future directions for the BC building regulatory system based on proposals in the provincial 2018 intentions paper, “Clean, Efficient Buildings” and national commitments, including standards for alterations to existing buildings. The presentation will also highlight several Energy Step Code residential design solutions associated with actual buildings under construction in BC. Finally, Andrew will summarize the key challenges and opportunities for achievement of net-zero energy ready construction by 2030, including key areas for potential BCBEC member design innovations.

 

Keynote Speaker


Kevin Vallely
Vallely Architecture

In 2003 Kevin Vallely was named one of Canada’s leading adventurers by the Globe and Mail. He is a member of the esteemed Explorer’s Club and was honoured as an Explorer’s Club Flag recipient for his expedition to the Northwest Passage in 2013. In 2009 Kevin broke the world record for the fastest unsupported trek to the Geographic South Pole as a member of a three-person Canadian team. His book Rowing the Northwest Passage: Adventure, Fear and Awe in a Rising Sea was published by Greystone Books in 2017.

Kevin is a registered architect living in North Vancouver, BC and runs his own company Vallely Architecture. He graduated from the McGill University School of Architecture in 1988 where he was awarded the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada medal as top graduating student. He’s a recipient of a Commonwealth Scholarship to Cambridge University.

Presentation: Great Expectation: The Resilient Mindset

Kevin’s keynote speaks to passion and perseverance and one’s capacity to move forward regardless of setback. The keynote builds around a question Kevin was asked by a young offender while skiing to the South Pole in 2009. “How do I keep going? Why don’t I quit?”

As Kevin marches to the South Pole he reflects on the qualities, behaviors and pathways that have kept him going both as an adventurer and an architect. What in his experience that has allowed him to maintain his passion and perseverance for all these years? How has he learned to be resilient? Large scale studies into things like giftedness, future success and job performance have all concluded that resilience is as important, if not more so, than intelligence. Research has shown that resilience is not a character trait but rather something that can be learned, cultivated and developed. On January 7th, 2009, Kevin and two teammates ski into the South Pole faster than anyone in history, breaking the world record by over 5 days. Kevin has cultivated his level of resilience and understands what it takes. His answer to the question “How do I keep going? Why don’t I quit?” will inspire and empower your audience.

 


Trevor Murdock
Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium

Trevor Murdock is a climate scientist with the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium in Victoria, BC where he leads the Regional Climate Impacts theme. Following an MSc in Earth and Ocean Sciences in 1997 from the University of Victoria in paleoclimate modelling, Trevor has spent over 20 years working on applied climate science to assist decision-making and planning. His work has focused on climate scenarios, online mapping tools, and downscaling to regional and local scales.

Presentation: Climate Change Impacts on Building Design & Adaptation

Climate change is our new reality and we are now in the realm of having to actively adapt to changing climate loads. So why are we designing our buildings to the climate norms from the past 30 years when our buildings have design service lives for the next 50+ years? What future climates can we anticipate, and what can we do to ensure our existing and new buildings can adapt and perform under these changing climate loads? Trevor Murdock, of the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, will discuss the latest climate science and provide some insight into the future climates we will experience in the Pacific Northwest. Thereafter, Robert Lepage, with RDH Building Science Inc., will then discuss some high-level climate change concepts through a building science perspective and introduce the Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) protocol through a case study on a hospital in British Columbia.

 


Rob Lepage
RDH Building Science Inc.

Robert Lepage is a building science research engineer who specializes in research and investigation work, with a focus on materials and systems testing. His work experience consists of a wide range of projects, including: building enclosure condition assessments, forensic investigation, building monitoring, field review, and laboratory and field testing.

Presentation: Climate Change Impacts on Building Design & Adaptation

Climate change is our new reality and we are now in the realm of having to actively adapt to changing climate loads. So why are we designing our buildings to the climate norms from the past 30 years when our buildings have design service lives for the next 50+ years? What future climates can we anticipate, and what can we do to ensure our existing and new buildings can adapt and perform under these changing climate loads? Trevor Murdock, of the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, will discuss the latest climate science and provide some insight into the future climates we will experience in the Pacific Northwest. Thereafter, Robert Lepage, with RDH Building Science Inc., will then discuss some high-level climate change concepts through a building science perspective and introduce the Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) protocol through a case study on a hospital in British Columbia.

 


Marcus Dell
RDH Building Science Inc.

Marcus Dell is a professional engineer who specializes in practical solutions to building enclosure problems. He combines his academic training with over 20 years of work experience to offer all-around knowledge of the application of building science principles to buildings around North America. His focus at RDH is on existing buildings and repair, renewal, and rehabilitation projects. In particular, he has advanced expertise in roof design and assemblies. He serves as a Director with RCI Inc, Western Canada Chapter and has published many papers and conducted research on a variety of roofing topics.

Presentation: “BEC” Talks: Historic Restoration – Spencer Building Study

Designed by McCarter and Nairn architects and constructed in 1925-26, the Spencer Building is an iconic structure located in the heart of Vancouver. Initially it housed Spencer’s department store; however, the building has been repurposed several times and today it is the site of Simon Fraser University downtown campus as well as government, business, and retail. Primarily comprised of brick masonry and cast stone in an art deco style, the building required major repairs to its enclosure. In this presentation I will discuss the recently completed restoration and conservation program that has been implemented on the exterior walls and windows. The primary goal of the program was to revitalize the historic components of the building while maintaining the original design intent and aesthetic. During the presentation I will discuss some of the challenges and the solutions implemented in response, including fabrication of new cast stone components and their structural attachment.

 


Wesley Narciso
JRS Engineering

Wesley Narciso is a Senior Project Engineer and Division Manager with JRS Engineering where he oversees the head office’s Existing Buildings Division. For approximately 17 years, Wesley has been providing engineering consulting services in Canada and the United States. This includes 5 years in materials testing and failure analysis and 12 years in building envelope consulting. His experience includes design, project management, financial analysis/capital asset planning, litigation support, expert witness testimony and warranty dispute resolution, for a variety of projects throughout the Pacific Northwest. Wesley has an undergraduate degree in Materials Engineering at UBC and is currently completing his Masters Degree in Building Science at BCIT. He is also the recipient of an Engineers Geoscientists BC President’s Award.

Presentation: “BEC” Talks: Sound Energy: Building Envelope Noise Control, Problems and Solutions

From face sealed walls, to rainscreen cladding, to exterior insulation, wall assembly design and construction has continued to evolve, but how has it affected sound transmission? Transmission loss (sound intensity) field testing, followed by acoustical modelling using simulation software for multi-layer structures, shows that newer wall assemblies consist of sound transmission qualities equal to or worse than traditional wall construction.

Vancouver and other BC municipalities have sound control requirements for dwellings in noisy areas, so what can we do to make everyone happy? Real-world design examples, with a focus on windows, will be illustrated and dissected discussing practical solutions.

 


Mark Bliss
BKL Consultants Ltd.

Mark Bliss, P.Eng., INCE, is President of BKL Consultants Ltd., Western Canada’s largest acoustical engineering firm. Mark has extensive experience assessing transportation and industry noise impacts within communities, has worked with all levels of government on noise policy development, and has appeared as an expert witness before the British Columbia Supreme Court. Mark has performed environmental noise assessments for proposed residential developments for the past 15 years. These projects involve sound level measurements, sound propagation and sound transmission predictions, and specifying building envelope design changes in order to meet municipal noise level requirements.

Presentation: “BEC” Talks: Sound Energy: Building Envelope Noise Control, Problems and Solutions

From face sealed walls, to rainscreen cladding, to exterior insulation, wall assembly design and construction has continued to evolve, but how has it affected sound transmission? Transmission loss (sound intensity) field testing, followed by acoustical modelling using simulation software for multi-layer structures, shows that newer wall assemblies consist of sound transmission qualities equal to or worse than traditional wall construction.

Vancouver and other BC municipalities have sound control requirements for dwellings in noisy areas, so what can we do to make everyone happy? Real-world design examples, with a focus on windows, will be illustrated and dissected discussing practical solutions.

 


Robert Bean
Healthy Heating

Robert Bean is a registered engineering technologist in building construction (ASET) and a professional licensee in mechanical engineering (APEGA). He is president of Indoor Climate Consulting Inc. and director of www.healthyheating.com. Bean is a past ASHRAE Distinguished Lecturer, recipient of the Lou Flagg Award and Distinguished Service Award. He is an instructor for the ASHRAE Learning Institute and serves on numerous committees related to indoor environments and energy.

Presentation: Using ASHRAE Standard 55 to Identify Thermal Discomfort Probabilities Due to Enclosure Designs

Next to sound, thermal discomfort is the second leading occupant complaint due to flawed indoor climates. The culprits are building codes and enclosure designs followed by poor HVAC solutions. This presentation will provide the background in thermal comfort science and Standards concluding with a case study using the ASHRAE 1383 Tool to show Standard 55 non-compliance/compliance based on enclosure design and choices in HVAC systems.

Details

Date:
October 26
Time:
7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Event Categories:
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Venue

JW Marriott Parq Vancouver
39 Smithe Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 0R3 Canada
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